Internet

Search and Advertising

Economists are interested in how the design of ad auctions affects search engine revenues, and how access to the Internet – and thus to search engines – affects retail prices and possibly leads to higher prices for certain consumers.

TAP Blog

Private browsing: What it does – and doesn’t do – to shield you from prying eyes on the web

Carnegie Mellon University computer science and privacy expert Lorrie Cranor and her colleague Hana Habib, Graduate Research Assistant with CMU, explain what the private-browsing tools available with most browsers actually provide users. They clarify: “don’t confuse privacy for anonymity.”

Lorrie Faith Cranor

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Fact Sheets

Search Engines, Advertising, and Auctions

Search engines – such as Google, Yahoo, Bing, and a variety of other smaller search engines – help users find what they are looking for online by finding web pages that match user-entered keywords. Search engines are free to users, but typically earn revenue through paid advertising.

Quote

Private browsing: What it does – and doesn’t do – to shield you from prying eyes on the web

“Private browsing does not make you anonymous online. Anyone who can see your internet traffic – your school or employer, your internet service provider, government agencies, people snooping on your public wireless connection – can see your browsing activity.” — Lorrie Cranor, Professor of Computer Science and of Engineering & Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University
Lorrie Faith Cranor
The Conversation
July 30, 2020

Featured Article

The Impact of Targeting Technology on Advertising Markets and Media Competition

This paper presents a formal analysis of advertising when the Internet allows targeting of advertisements.

By: Susan Athey, Joshua Gans