Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

Internet

Different business models have evolved for providing information on the Internet, including search engines, which make money from advertising; subscription web sites; and free web sites which drive off-line sales. Scholars examine the evolution of this marketplace and its implications for content providers and businesses.

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TAP Blog

Professors Geoffrey Parker, Dartmouth College, and Marshall Van Alstyne, Boston University, share insights into why some platform-based businesses have been able to pivot and thrive amidst the COVID-19 restrictions while others flounder.
In their recent paper, “A Duty of Loyalty for Privacy Law,” Professors Neil Richards and Woodrow Hartzog propose imposing a duty of loyalty on companies that collect and process human information.
Carnegie Mellon University computer science and privacy expert Lorrie Cranor and her colleague Hana Habib, Graduate Research Assistant with CMU, explain what the private-browsing tools available with most browsers actually provide users. They clarify: “don’t confuse privacy for anonymity.”
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom has studied working-from-home (WFH) and its impact on employees, firms, and societies for many years. In this article, he presents new results from a US survey on WFH during the coronavirus pandemic.
George Washington University privacy law expert Daniel Solove shares his insights from reviewing the ‘Schrems II’ ruling, and he discusses possible options –post Schrems II-- to transfer personal data from the EU to the U.S.
Georgia Tech law and ethics professor Peter Swire reviews the Schrems II ruling and discusses some of the challenges with reconciling fundamental rights and national security.
This is the second of a two-part post from TAP guest blogger, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes. Professor Christakis discusses the constitutional implications created by the Schrems II judgment not only for the EU but also for greater Europe.
This is the first of a two-part post from TAP guest blogger, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes. Professor Christakis discusses the uncertainties created by the Schrems II judgment for the future of international data transfers.
Following the “Schrems II” decision, with the invalidation of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, privacy expert Omer Tene explains why data will continue to flow across borders, including from Europe to the U.S.
Professor Eric Goldman, Santa Clara High Tech Law Institute, provides a narrated and selective bibliography on Section 230.
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Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Quote

Apple's 'Extreme' App Policies Give Google Defense in Fortnite Antitrust Suit

“Having other options definitely makes it a bit harder to say something is anticompetitive,” Economides said, speaking generally about app stores.“ With Apple, things are extreme because there’s no alternative whatsoever. That makes for a stronger potential case.” — Nicholas Economides, Professor of Economics, New York University
Nicholas Economides
Reuters
August 17, 2020

Featured Article

Weaponized Narrative is The New Battlespace

Weaponized narrative, the use of disinformation to undermine opponents, is increasingly important to national security. The United States lags behind Russia, China, and other powers in using weaponized narrative.

By: Braden Allenby, Joel Garreau