Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

Internet

Different business models have evolved for providing information on the Internet, including search engines, which make money from advertising; subscription web sites; and free web sites which drive off-line sales. Scholars examine the evolution of this marketplace and its implications for content providers and businesses.

Back to main Internet page

Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Privacy and Consumers

There are a number of privacy issues related to how online companies collect, store, use and share personally identifiable information; and how consumers are informed about what is done with their information online.

Search Engines, Advertising, and Auctions

Search engines – such as Google, Yahoo, Bing, and a variety of other smaller search engines – help users find what they are looking for online by finding web pages that match user-entered keywords. Search engines are free to users, but typically earn revenue through paid advertising.

TAP Blog

New Op-Ed: People Who Understand Section 230 Actually Love It

Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman shares an op-ed piece he recently wrote that discusses Section 230 and the legislative efforts to modify or repeal it.

Eric Goldman

Quote

He Created the Web. Now He’s Out to Remake the Digital World.

“In this changed regulatory setting, there is a market opportunity for Tim Berners-Lee's firm and others to offer individuals better ways to control their data.” — Peter Swire, Law and Ethics Professor , Georgia Tech

Peter Swire
The New York Times
January 10, 2021

Featured Article

Rendering Sensible Salient 

Technological changes threaten democracy, producing polarization and fragmentation. Deliberative conventions of ordinary citizens could help restore a common understanding of issues.

By: Lawrence Lessig