Networks and Infrastructure

Net Neutrality

“Net Neutrality” refers to the concept of an “open Internet” whereby end-users can access the lawful content, applications, services and devices of their choice. Policymakers around the world are considering whether and how to ensure that the Internet remains “open” and Internet access service providers do not improperly block or degrade content sent over their networks.

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Georgetown University professor Paul Ohm and Georgia Tech professor Peter Swire provided this week’s Senate hearing with their thoughts on the FCC’s Proposed Rules for regulating Internet privacy.
At a U.S. Senate Hearing that will examine the FCC’s proposal for Internet service provider customer privacy, Georgia Tech privacy and cyberlaw scholar Peter Swire will share his knowledge about ISPs and privacy.
Stanford professor, and net neutrality advocate, Barbara van Schewick explains why T-Mobile’s new Binge On program may feel good in the short-term, but harms consumers in the long run.
In an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Harvard law and ethics professor Lawrence Lessig discusses how privacy, surveillance, and international governance of the Internet and telecommunications networks will approach milestones in 2016.
Professor Joshua Gans, Rotman School of Management, examines the impact of the decision by India’s Telecom Regulatory Authority to stop a program that had allowed some content to be provided freely.
Tomorrow (Tues. Oct 27) the European Parliament will vote on rules intended to protect network neutrality in the European Union (EU). Professor Barbara van Schewick explains why the proposal is weaker than current net neutrality rules in the U.S., and offers suggestions for securing meaningful net neutrality for Europe.
Stanford Professor Barbara van Schewick is recognized for her work in preserving the open Internet.
Professor Barbara van Schewick, Director of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, explains how the FCC’s Open Internet Rules will be impacted by some of the GOP add-ons to the House Appropriations Bill. Professor van Schewick’s post was originally published June 11th, the Appropriations Bill was approved today, June 17th.
Economics professor Nicholas Economides explains why the Federal Communications Commission’s recent decision regarding net neutrality will protect the free flow of content on the Internet and ensure fair competition.
Professor Joshua Gans, Rotman School of Management, examines the value of broadband competition, and questions if it would make net neutrality regulations redundant.
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Fact Sheets

Net Neutrality

Given the significance of the Internet, preserving its “openness” – an idea often referred to as “network neutrality” or “net neutrality” – has been a long-standing issue.

Quote

Big ISPs Finally Gave Up on Blocking California’s Landmark Network Neutrality Law

“While California has been free to enforce its net neutrality law for over a year, today removes any doubt that the state has the right to protect its economy and democratic discourse from the whims of large phone and cable companies.” — Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law, Stanford University

Barbara van Schewick
Fast Company
May 6, 2022

Featured Article

California Defends Its Net Neutrality Law

Net neutrality law limits Internet Service Providers’ (ISPs) control of Internet uses and users. Federal net neutrality rules were repealed, but states should be able to enact their own net neutrality rules.

By: Barbara van Schewick