Networks and Infrastructure

Net Neutrality

“Net Neutrality” refers to the concept of an “open Internet” whereby end-users can access the lawful content, applications, services and devices of their choice. Policymakers around the world are considering whether and how to ensure that the Internet remains “open” and Internet access service providers do not improperly block or degrade content sent over their networks.

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TAP Blog

TAP scholars Tim Wu, Jonathan Zittrain, Edward Felten, and Lawrence Lessig join in the net neutrality debate in the New York Times “Room for Debate” section.
Two recent videos examine the net neutrality issue. In the first one, Bill Moyers talks with FCC commissioner Michael Copps about the future of net neutrality. And in the second one, Harvard Law Professor Larry Lessig, walks us through the history of America's broadband downfall.
The FCC should pass the non-discrimination rule, usually called “net neutrality.”
With last week’s congressional hearings on Comcast-NBC Universal merger, there is increased interest in net neutrality issues.
YouTube video of Professor Lawrence Lessig's presentation at the FCC Hearing on Internet Practices (April 2008).
Academic Arguments on Net Neutrality
An IP Colloquium Podcast on Digital Content
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Fact Sheets

Net Neutrality

Given the significance of the Internet, preserving its “openness” – an idea often referred to as “network neutrality” or “net neutrality” – has been a long-standing issue.

Quote

Appeals Court Upholds California’s Right to Enforce Its Net Neutrality Law While the FCC Remains at a Standstill

“Today’s ruling means California can continue to enforce its net neutrality law and protect Californians against unfair practices by the companies they pay to get online.” — Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law, Stanford University

Barbara van Schewick
CNBC
January 28, 2022

Featured Article

Ideological Segregation Online and Offline

Measures the degree of ideological segregation in the market for online news and compares this to other news sources.

By: Jesse Shapiro, Matthew Gentzkow