Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

Networks and Infrastructure

Although “the Internet” seems ethereal, it is in fact a network of networks that connects billions of users around the world. The capabilities of the Internet are dependent on the reach of those networks. Many governments worldwide are considering how to effectively and efficiently make robust networks available to their citizens to enable them to access the Internet.

Back to main Networks and Infrastructure page

TAP Blog

Harvard business professor Shane Greenstein explains the economic factors that produce network congestion.
Economics professor Nicholas Economides explains why the Federal Communications Commission’s recent decision regarding net neutrality will protect the free flow of content on the Internet and ensure fair competition.
Professors Kevin Werbach, Wharton School, and Phil Weiser, Silicon Flatirons, explain why there is no cause for concern about the FCC’s shift toward reclassifying broadband Internet access under Title II of the Communications Act.
Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler released his proposal for ensuring network neutrality by reclassifying Internet service providers as a telecommunications service. TAP Scholars explain the value and challenges this proposal brings.
George Washington University Law School Professors Arturo Carrillo and Dawn Nunziato submitted a Comment to the FCC urging the Commission to adopt strong net neutrality rules so as not to violate the United States' international human rights and trade obligations.
The Net Neutrality and Global Internet Freedom Conference on October 23rd will explore the impact of net neutrality and net discrimination on Internet freedom and human rights within the United States and around the world.
Professors Ilya Segal and Jonathan Levin, both with Stanford University, are two of the leading experts in auction theory and implementation chosen by the Federal Communications Commission to design the unprecedented broadcast spectrum incentive auction. Professors Segal and Levin graciously shared their expertise and time with TAP in order to explain the reverse and forward auctions, the components that they are directly involved with.
In this piece written for The New Yorker, law professor Tim Wu, Columbia Law School, explains how Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler’s proposed new network neutrality rules would give broadband providers the right to charge content providers for faster network access.
Professor Kevin Werbach, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, discusses why he supports FCC Chairman Wheeler’s proposed approach of using authority under Section 706 of the Communications Act to protect the open Internet.
Economics professor Joshua Gans, Rotman School of Management, summarizes key points from his recent working paper, “Weak versus Strong Net Neutrality.”
Results 21 - 30 of 84
|< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >|

Fact Sheets

Net Neutrality

Given the significance of the Internet, preserving its “openness” – an idea often referred to as “network neutrality” or “net neutrality” – has been a long-standing issue.

Quote

Appeals Court Ruling for Qualcomm “A Victory of Theory Over Facts”

“I would describe it as a victory of theory over facts.” — Tim Wu, Professor of Law, Columbia University
Tim Wu
Ars Technica
August 14, 2020

Featured Article

Network Neutrality, Broadband Discrimination

This paper looks at ideas to support open access to the Internet, including net neutrality rules.

By: Tim Wu