Networks and Infrastructure

Wireless

Wireless networks allow users to access telecommunications and the Internet while on the move. The wireless devices operate on the electromagnetic spectrum, which is a finite resource. The allocation and assignment of spectrum, particularly given the burgeoning demand for wireless access to the Internet, poses a unique set of policy decisions for regulators worldwide.

TAP Blog

Consumers Are Suing Apple for Slowing Down Their iPhones. Did Apple Break the Law?

University of Chicago law and economics professor Omri Ben-Shahar delves into the legal implications of Appleā€™s handling of its recent iOS software update.

Omri Ben-Shahar

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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Quote

Net Neutrality Is the Secret Sauce that Has Made the Internet Awesome

"Net neutrality protections are absolutely consistent with a free market framework. They are really a way to protect all these free markets that arose from and depend on the internet." — Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law, Stanford University

Barbara van Schewick
Vox
December 14, 2017

Featured Article

Using Spectrum Auctions to Enhance Competition in Wireless Services

This paper looks at how regulators can support more competition between different wireless services.

By: Gregory L. Rosston, Peter Cramton, Evan Kwerel, Andrzej (Andy) Skrzypacz