Networks and Infrastructure

Wireless

Wireless networks allow users to access telecommunications and the Internet while on the move. The wireless devices operate on the electromagnetic spectrum, which is a finite resource. The allocation and assignment of spectrum, particularly given the burgeoning demand for wireless access to the Internet, poses a unique set of policy decisions for regulators worldwide.

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TAP Blog

In an op-ed article for the Los Angeles Times, Woodrow Hartzog, Professor of Law and Computer Science at Northeastern University, shares his insights into Google and Apple’s contact tracing project, and he discusses the “three concerns to keep in mind about relying on technology to mitigate the COVID-19 crisis.”
Privacy expert Paul Schwartz, UC Berkeley, examines two proposed federal bills developed for the regulation of a COVID-19-tracking app in order to protect the privacy of health information.
UC Berkeley Professor Paul Schwartz examines the debates around the globe about the use and development of COVID-19 tracking apps. Given the great concern about the impact of these apps on privacy and civil liberties, he provides a compilation of best practices from European and U.S. data privacy protection organizations.
Professor Mary Gray, Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, expresses reservations about the effectiveness and equity of a cell phone app aimed to put COVID-19 contact tracing in individuals’ hands.
Take a look at the top viewed blog posts from this past year that have been written by TAP scholars.
In this opinion piece written for The New York Times, University of Pennsylvania Legal Studies and Business Ethics professor Kevin Werbach explains why the wireless open access proposal from the Trump re-election campaign is worth considering.
How did the U.S. Supreme Court arrive at its Carpenter decision? University of Chicago Law School professor Lior Strahilevitz offers his analysis of the Justices’ opinions.
Colorado law professor Margot Kaminski discusses the “paradigm-shifting implications” for Fourth Amendment and privacy law that come out of Chief Justice Robert’s opinion in the Carpenter decision.
Carpenter is incorrect,” says New York University law professor Richard Epstein. Professor Epstein explains why invoking the third-party doctrine was the wrong analysis for this case that uses cell-site location information to convict a thief.
George Washington University privacy law professor Daniel Solove discusses the Carpenter decision, and he explains why he believes the ruling falls short of its potential to address the shortcomings of the third-party doctrine in the digital age.
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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Quote

Contact Tracing – The Privacy Vs Urgency Dilemma for Governments in the Fight Against COVID-19

“Either you have a system unlikely to help people navigate their world, to leave their house and feel safe, or you have privacy trade-offs.”
 — Ryan Calo, Professor of Law, University of Washington
M. Ryan Calo
South China Morning Post
June 4, 2020

Featured Article

The Wasteland: Anticommons, White Spaces, and the Fallacy of Spectrum

This article analyzes the advantages of allowing public access to broadcast frequencies between commercial stations.

By: Kevin Werbach