Networks and Infrastructure

Wireless

Wireless networks allow users to access telecommunications and the Internet while on the move. The wireless devices operate on the electromagnetic spectrum, which is a finite resource. The allocation and assignment of spectrum, particularly given the burgeoning demand for wireless access to the Internet, poses a unique set of policy decisions for regulators worldwide.

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Quotes

Contact Tracing – The Privacy Vs Urgency Dilemma for Governments in the Fight Against COVID-19

“Either you have a system unlikely to help people navigate their world, to leave their house and feel safe, or you have privacy trade-offs.”
 — Ryan Calo, Professor of Law, University of Washington
M. Ryan Calo
Source: South China Morning Post
June 4, 2020

Coronavirus Tracing Apps Are Coming. Here’s How They Could Reshape Surveillance as We Know It

“We are repeatedly told that contact tracing apps and COVID-19-related surveillance are temporary measures for use until the pandemic passes. That’s likely to be a fantasy.”
— Woodrow Hartzog, Professor of Law and Computer Science at Northeastern University
Woodrow Hartzog
Source: Los Angeles Times
May 12, 2020

How Human-Centered Tech Can Beat COVID-19 Through Contact Tracing

To succeed, contact tracing programs require that people trust the entity to whom they are reporting. Trust is built on empathy, patience and the ability to help someone who has just been exposed to a life-threatening disease. — Mary Gray, Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research and Fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society
Mary L. Gray
Source: The Hill
April 21, 2020

T-Mobile-Sprint Merger Wins Approval from U.S. Judge

"If this merger is not anticompetitive, even with the remedies agreed to, it is hard to know what is." — Eleanor Fox, Professor of Law, New York University


Eleanor Fox
Source: Reuters
February 10, 2020

Trump’s 5G Plan Is More Than a Gift to His Base

"Making capacity available in real time at market prices limits hoarding and encourages innovation. Unleashing our brilliant start-up ecosystem through such market mechanisms, along with opportunities for unlicensed access to wireless capacity, is America’s best hope to beat China in 5G." — Kevin Werbach, Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics, University of Pennsylvania


Kevin Werbach
Source: The New York Times
March 6, 2019

Why Tech Giants Will Love the Supreme Court's Ruling for Digital Privacy

"We’ve entered an age in which people are constantly sharing lots of information about themselves with Google or with AT&T or with their internet service provider. All of the sudden the fact that that information is being shared does not mean that the government can get that information without a search warrant." — Lior Strahilevitz, Professor of Law, University of Chicago


Lior Strahilevitz
Source: Yahoo Finance
June 22, 2018

Net Neutrality Is the Secret Sauce that Has Made the Internet Awesome

"Net neutrality protections are absolutely consistent with a free market framework. They are really a way to protect all these free markets that arose from and depend on the internet." — Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law, Stanford University


Barbara van Schewick
Source: Vox
December 14, 2017

Stanford Study: T-Mobile's Binge On Is 'Likely Illegal'

"T-Mobile’s Binge On is aptly named — it feels good in the short-term but harms consumers in the long run. The program limits user choice, distorts competition, stifles innovation, and harms free speech on the Internet. If more ISPs offer similar programs, these harms will only grow worse." — Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law, Stanford University


Barbara van Schewick
Source: The Verge
January 29, 2016

Why Apple Pay Can Succeed Where Google Wallet Failed

"Apple has a lot of experience in squeezing companies that thought they were the ones squeezing everyone else." — James Grimmelmann, Professor of Law, University of Maryland


James Grimmelmann
Source: Slate
September 12, 2014

With Apple Pay, the Tech Leader Takes Its Shot at Replacing the Wallet

"It won’t be too long before we look back on this era and think it’s nuts." — Jonathan Zittrain, Professor of Law, Harvard University


Jonathan Zittrain
Source: The Washington Post
September 9, 2014
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TAP Blog

Woodrow Hartzog Discusses How Contact-Tracing Apps Could Reshape Surveillance

In an op-ed article for the Los Angeles Times, Woodrow Hartzog, Professor of Law and Computer Science at Northeastern University, shares his insights into Google and Apple’s contact tracing project, and he discusses the “three concerns to keep in mind about relying on technology to mitigate the COVID-19 crisis.”

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Featured Article

The Wasteland: Anticommons, White Spaces, and the Fallacy of Spectrum

This article analyzes the advantages of allowing public access to broadcast frequencies between commercial stations.

By: Kevin Werbach