Issues

Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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TAP Blog

Professors Geoffrey Parker, Dartmouth College, and Marshall Van Alstyne, Boston University, share insights into why some platform-based businesses have been able to pivot and thrive amidst the COVID-19 restrictions while others flounder.
In their recent paper, “A Duty of Loyalty for Privacy Law,” Professors Neil Richards and Woodrow Hartzog propose imposing a duty of loyalty on companies that collect and process human information.
Carnegie Mellon University computer science and privacy expert Lorrie Cranor and her colleague Hana Habib, Graduate Research Assistant with CMU, explain what the private-browsing tools available with most browsers actually provide users. They clarify: “don’t confuse privacy for anonymity.”
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom has studied working-from-home (WFH) and its impact on employees, firms, and societies for many years. In this article, he presents new results from a US survey on WFH during the coronavirus pandemic.
Georgia Tech law and ethics professor Peter Swire reviews the Schrems II ruling and discusses some of the challenges with reconciling fundamental rights and national security.
This is the second of a two-part post from TAP guest blogger, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes. Professor Christakis discusses the constitutional implications created by the Schrems II judgment not only for the EU but also for greater Europe.
This is the first of a two-part post from TAP guest blogger, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes. Professor Christakis discusses the uncertainties created by the Schrems II judgment for the future of international data transfers.
Following the “Schrems II” decision, with the invalidation of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, privacy expert Omer Tene explains why data will continue to flow across borders, including from Europe to the U.S.
Professor Eric Goldman, Santa Clara High Tech Law Institute, provides a narrated and selective bibliography on Section 230.
University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo discusses what steps social media companies and the government can legally take to stop the spread of misinformation, while also ensuring that everyone has the right to express their opinion.
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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Quote

Apple's 'Extreme' App Policies Give Google Defense in Fortnite Antitrust Suit

“Having other options definitely makes it a bit harder to say something is anticompetitive,” Economides said, speaking generally about app stores.“ With Apple, things are extreme because there’s no alternative whatsoever. That makes for a stronger potential case.” — Nicholas Economides, Professor of Economics, New York University
Nicholas Economides
Reuters
August 17, 2020

Featured Article

Cloud Computing: Architectural and Policy Implications

This paper offers an overview of cloud computing technology and its economic implications.

By: Christopher Yoo