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Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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TAP Blog

In their recent paper, “Shining a Light on Dark Patterns,” law professor Lior Strahilevitz and Jamie Luguri, both of the University of Chicago Law School, share findings from two large-scale experiments in which consumers were exposed to dark patterns.
Professor Joseph Turow, Annenberg School for Communication, discusses the technology changes in voice profiling, and explains how “companies could soon tailor what they try to sell you based on the mood conveyed by the sound of your voice.”
In her new book, Atlas of AI: Power, Politics, and the Planetary Costs of Artificial Intelligence, Professor Kate Crawford, USC Annenberg School of Communication, offers a material and political perspective on what it takes to make AI and how it centralizes power.
In this second of a two-part article exploring the intense negotiations between the US and EU over adequate surveillance in the name of national security, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes, examines the EU position on the relevance of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and shares possible counter-arguments for the US perspective.
In this first of a two-part articles exploring the intense negotiations between the US and EU over what should be included and excluded when it comes to surveillance in the name of national security, and as a successor to the now invalid Privacy Shield, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes, delves into the US arguments for direct access to data by its intelligence agencies.
Evan Selinger, Rochester Institute of Technology philosophy professor, talks with journalist Clive Thompson about how the media covers responsible uses of technology.
Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman shares key takeaways from his new paper addressing the wide range of content moderation options that lie between “leave up” and “remove.”
Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick explains why AT&T’s decision to suspend its sponsored data program is a “win for an open and free internet.”
Professor Nicholas Economides, Stern School of Business of NYU, and Professor Ioannis Lianos, University College of London Faculty of Laws, explain how digital platforms have caused a market failure.
Professor Daniel Solove, George Washington University, explains why he believes Section 230 “…should be restored to its original meaning and purpose – a much more limited scope than it has now.” He discusses how recovering distributor liability would promote greater responsibility for platforms and ISPs.
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Fact Sheets

Net Neutrality

Given the significance of the Internet, preserving its “openness” – an idea often referred to as “network neutrality” or “net neutrality” – has been a long-standing issue.

Quote

This Is the White House's Plan to Take on Facebook

“The White House, like everyone else in Washington, recognizes that the tide is high and the time for action is now.” — Tim Wu, Special Assistant to the President for Technology and Competition Policy, National Economic Council

Tim Wu
Time
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Featured Article

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