Issues

Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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TAP Blog

George Washington University privacy law professor Daniel Solove outlines why the U.S. does not currently have a comprehensive privacy law; and, he provides a practical path to establish federal oversight for privacy and security protections.
The Economics of Artificial Intelligence: An Agenda, edited by Rotman School of Management professors Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb, seeks to set the agenda for the economic research on the impact of AI.
Mary Gray and Siddharth Suri’s new book, Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley from Building a New Global Underclass, explores the lives of people who are paid to train artificial intelligence and serve as “humans in the loop” delivering on-demand information services.
TAP Scholars Danielle Citron, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, and Ryan Calo, University of Washington, examine the trend of automation in agency decision-making, and find the automation of the administrative state “deeply concerning”.
In this opinion piece written for The New York Times, University of Pennsylvania Legal Studies and Business Ethics professor Kevin Werbach explains why the wireless open access proposal from the Trump re-election campaign is worth considering.
In their new article, “You Might Be a Robot,” Stanford law professors Mark Lemley and Bryan Casey offer a solution to the challenges of defining and legislating artificial intelligence: “laws should regulate behavior, not things”.
Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein outlines the internet infrastructure trends from the recent past, and shows how they’ve evolved to support the modern digital economy.
Though 2019 is well underway, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman’s recap of 2018’s Internet law issues provides a valuable perspective on the ongoing internet challenges for regulators, policymakers, and technology businesses.
Artificial intelligence scholars Erik Brynjolfsson (MIT) and Kate Crawford (AI Now Institute) react to last week’s Executive Order outlining President Trump’s plan to support the development of artificial intelligence technology.
Matthew Gentzkow and his colleagues at Stanford and New York University report from their study on the way Facebook affects a range of individual and social welfare measures.
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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Quote

How Will COVID-19 Change the World by 2025? How Remote Learning Changes Education

"To close the digital divide, the federal government needs to view broadband like the US Postal Service when it was first developed, concentrating on connecting all citizens rather than just communities where the service makes economic sense." — Randal Picker, Professor of Law, University of Chicago

Randal Picker
Futurity
May 6, 2020

Featured Article

Using Spectrum Auctions to Enhance Competition in Wireless Services

This paper looks at how regulators can support more competition between different wireless services.

By: Gregory L. Rosston, Peter Cramton, Evan Kwerel, Andrzej (Andy) Skrzypacz