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Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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TAP Blog

Professor Théodore Christakis, Université Grenoble Alpes, provides preliminary analyses of the post-Schrems II “Recommendations” by the European Data Protection Board.
Berkeley law professor Pamela Samuelson’s recent article examines proposed reforms of the DMCA’s safe harbor rules that limit the liability of ISPs hosting user-generated content. Professor Samuelson urges Congress to “take a balanced approach” and “consider the interests of a wide range of stakeholders”.
Professors Jonathan Zittrain and James Mickens examine many issues associated with the security of our society’s interconnected systems in online discussion.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom, widely known for his research on remote work, shares his expertise about the ups and downs of working from home.
MIT Professor Daron Acemoglu examines data sharing; he looks at both the potential benefits that come from predictive big data approaches as well as the negative effects of data transactions.
Next week, privacy law experts Professor Daniel Solove, George Washington University, and Professor Paul Schwartz, University of California, Berkeley, gather privacy and security professionals together for a 3-day virtual forum.
Erik Brynjolfsson and colleagues share findings from a study that looked at the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on remote work.
Professors Geoffrey Parker, Dartmouth College, and Marshall Van Alstyne, Boston University, share insights into why some platform-based businesses have been able to pivot and thrive amidst the COVID-19 restrictions while others flounder.
In their recent paper, “A Duty of Loyalty for Privacy Law,” Professors Neil Richards and Woodrow Hartzog propose imposing a duty of loyalty on companies that collect and process human information.
Carnegie Mellon University computer science and privacy expert Lorrie Cranor and her colleague Hana Habib, Graduate Research Assistant with CMU, explain what the private-browsing tools available with most browsers actually provide users. They clarify: “don’t confuse privacy for anonymity.”
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Fact Sheets

Broadband Access and Infrastructure

High-speed Internet access – often referred to as “broadband” – is a set of technologies that, taken together, are recognized as a potential catalyst for global economic and social change.

Quote

This Is the White House's Plan to Take on Facebook

“The White House, like everyone else in Washington, recognizes that the tide is high and the time for action is now.” — Tim Wu, Special Assistant to the President for Technology and Competition Policy, National Economic Council

Tim Wu
Time
October 7, 2021

Featured Article

The Surveillance Implications of Efforts to Combat Cyber Harassment

Surveillance helps stop cyber harassment, the abuse of victims online. Police use technology to record evidence posted on social media or to identify anonymous perpetrators. However, surveillance can be intrusive.

By: Danielle Citron, Liz Clark Rinehart