Issues

Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Search Engines, Advertising, and Auctions

Search engines – such as Google, Yahoo, Bing, and a variety of other smaller search engines – help users find what they are looking for online by finding web pages that match user-entered keywords. Search engines are free to users, but typically earn revenue through paid advertising.

Net Neutrality

Given the significance of the Internet, preserving its “openness” – an idea often referred to as “network neutrality” or “net neutrality” – has been a long-standing issue.

Cloud Computing

“Cloud computing” describes how computer-related services and software increasingly have been provided over the Internet and other networks since the late 1990s.

Broadband Access and Infrastructure

High-speed Internet access – often referred to as “broadband” – is a set of technologies that, taken together, are recognized as a potential catalyst for global economic and social change.

TAP Blog

Outsourcing IT and Technological Differentiation: Evidence from Digital Startups

In a new paper, Michael Impink, doctoral candidate in Strategy at NYU Stern School of Business, examines the tradeoff between efficiencies gained from outsourcing IT and the ability to differentiate digital products.

TAP Guest Blogger

Quote

What We Know Now About the Business Impact of Hybrid Work

“But the biggest challenge—and maybe the one unexpected bit—is how much employees have got comfortable with choice of days in the office and like to flip that around each week, for whatever reason, childcare reasons, work, personal reasons, etc. ” — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University

Nicholas Bloom
Time
September 6, 2022

Featured Article

How Hybrid Working from Home Works Out

Hybrid working from home (WFH) has greatly increased since the pandemic. Data shows that WFH employees enjoy increased job satisfaction and lower attrition. WFH changes the structure of the work week and messaging behavior.

By: Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, Ruobing Han