Issues

Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Search Engines, Advertising, and Auctions

Search engines – such as Google, Yahoo, Bing, and a variety of other smaller search engines – help users find what they are looking for online by finding web pages that match user-entered keywords. Search engines are free to users, but typically earn revenue through paid advertising.

Net Neutrality

Given the significance of the Internet, preserving its “openness” – an idea often referred to as “network neutrality” or “net neutrality” – has been a long-standing issue.

Cloud Computing

“Cloud computing” describes how computer-related services and software increasingly have been provided over the Internet and other networks since the late 1990s.

Broadband Access and Infrastructure

High-speed Internet access – often referred to as “broadband” – is a set of technologies that, taken together, are recognized as a potential catalyst for global economic and social change.

TAP Blog

Shhhh, They’re Listening – Inside the Coming Voice-Profiling Revolution

Professor Joseph Turow, Annenberg School for Communication, discusses the technology changes in voice profiling, and explains how “companies could soon tailor what they try to sell you based on the mood conveyed by the sound of your voice.”

Joseph Turow

Quote

HBO Max Viewing Will Start Counting Against AT&T Data Limits

“People should be free to choose which videos they want to watch -- whether that’s Netflix, Twitch or their local church’s Sunday service -- without the company they pay to get online trying to influence their choices.”  — Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law, Stanford University
Barbara van Schewick
Bloomberg
March 17, 2021

Featured Article

Ideological Segregation Online and Offline

Measures the degree of ideological segregation in the market for online news and compares this to other news sources.

By: Jesse Shapiro, Matthew Gentzkow