Issues

Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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Quotes

House Antitrust Bills Could Change the Internet as We Know It

"Still, don't underestimate the tech industry's capacity for fighting the laws — both in and outside the courtroom. One imagines they will spend a wealth of resources on lawyers, economic consulting firms, technical experts, public relations specialists and all of the arts that make Washington a thriving regulatory capital, to oppose this." — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University

 


William E. Kovacic
Source: CNN Business
June 23, 2021

Lina Khan, Big Tech Skeptic, Named FTC Chair Mere Hours After Confirmation

“Lina Khan has pushed the academic conversation on tech, and now she has to push the agenda at the FTC.” — Shane Greenstein, Professor, Harvard Business School


Shane Greenstein
Source: Ars Technica
June 16, 2021

Lawmakers, Taking Aim at Big Tech, Push Sweeping Overhaul of Antitrust

“This is a reaction to the fact that our antitrust laws have been construed so narrowly by the Supreme Court. Because of this problem, it is very appropriate for Congress to be stepping in to prohibit and determine what’s bad and what’s good for markets.” — Eleanor M. Fox, Professor of Law, New York University
Eleanor Fox
Source: The New York Times
June 11, 2021

Don’t Let Employees Pick Their WFH Days

One concern is managing a hybrid team, where some people are at home and others are at the office. I hear endless anxiety about this generating an office in-group and a home out-group. — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University


Nicholas Bloom
Source: Harvard Business Review
May 25, 2021

Should Alexa Read Our Moods?

“Using the human body for discriminating among people is something that we should not do.” — Joseph Turow, Professor of Media Systems & Industries, University of Pennsylvania


Joseph Turow
Source: The New York Times
May 19, 2021

How Websites Use "Dark Patterns" to Manipulate You

“This is a classic obstruction dark pattern — we're making it a little bit more painful, we're sucking up a little bit of their free time if they want to say no.” — Lior Strahilevitz , Professor of Law, University of Chicago


Lior Strahilevitz
Source: CBS News
May 14, 2021

Can the FTC Stop the Tech Industry’s Use of ‘Dark Patterns’?

“There’s no backlash for companies that employ these techniques, if our results are externally valid. They can employ just a couple of dark patterns and get away with it.” — Lior Strahilevitz, Professor of Law, University of Chicago
Lior Strahilevitz
Source: Fast Company
May 6, 2021

Snapchat Can Be Sued Over Role In Fatal Car Crash, Court Rules

“I don't think that this opinion actually will open up the Pandora's Box of saying, 'You can sue a website for how it's designed under all circumstances” — Eric Goldman, Professor of Law, Santa Clara University


Eric Goldman
Source: NPR: Technology
May 4, 2021

Shhhh, They’re Listening – Inside the Coming Voice-Profiling Revolution

“Consider, too, the discrimination that can take place if voice profilers follow some scientists’ claims that it is possible to use an individual’s vocalizations to tell the person’s height, weight, race, gender, and health.” — Joseph Turow, Professor of Media Systems, Annenberg School for Communication


Joseph Turow
Source: Fast Company
May 3, 2021

Stopping the Manipulation Machines

“Everyone is frustrated with dark patterns. Companies are taking a calculated risk that they won’t get caught doing deceptive things because there is no consistent enforcement mechanism for this.” — Lior Strahilevitz, Professor of Law, University of Chicago
Lior Strahilevitz
Source: The New York Times
April 30, 2021
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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Featured Article

Causing Copyright

In deciding whether a creator is entitled to copyright protection, courts often consider whether the creator caused the work to be produced. Copyright law should develop a more coherent theory of causation.

By: Shyamkrishna Balganesh