Issues

Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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Quotes

Leading In 2021: 5 Key Business Trends And 15 Companies To Watch

Nicholas Bloom, a remote work expert at Stanford, supports the hybrid approach, recommending that leaders let employees work from home one to three days a week once the pandemic ends. — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University


Nicholas Bloom
Source: Forbes
December 21, 2020

The Brussels Effect Comes for Big Tech

The stakes for the big tech giants are particularly high because EU regulations often have a global impact — a phenomenon known as the “Brussels effect.” — Anu Bradford, Professor of Law, Columbia University


Anu Bradford
Source: Taipei Times
December 21, 2020

'This Is Big': US Lawmakers Take Aim at Once-Untouchable Big Tech

"There’s not been a cluster of cases of this significance since the 1970s. This is a big deal." — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University


William E. Kovacic
Source: The Guardian
December 19, 2020

Facebook and Google Cases Are Our Last Chance to Save the Economy from Monopolization

"In prosecuting the Google and Facebook cases, the government’s lawyers will have to walk a fine line between realism and ambition." — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University


William E. Kovacic
Source: The Washington Post
December 18, 2020

Bolstered by Pandemic, Tech Titans Face Growing Scrutiny

"We must regulate the platforms, but be careful not to make scapegoats of them." — Jacques Cremer, Professor of Economics and Research Faculty , Toulouse School of Economics


Jacques Crémer
Source: France 24
December 16, 2020

These Are the Key Arguments in the Antitrust Case Against Facebook

"Can the FTC and the states prove harm—actual harm or likely harm—and if yes, then will they be able to give the court confidence in a breakup? That, in my opinion, is the central point of contention in this case." — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University


William E. Kovacic
Source: Fast Company
December 11, 2020

'The Wrath Of Mark': 4 Takeaways From The Government's Case Against Facebook

"Even to a jaded reader of antitrust-like documents over time, [this] opens your eyes and causes your jaw to drop." — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University


William E. Kovacic
Source: National Public Radio
December 11, 2020

Facebook Lawsuits Don't Show Much Consumer Harm, But Must They?

"The Facebook lawsuits can be hard to prove because you have to persuade the court that the inference of that kind of harm is strong based on the conduct." — Andrew Gavil, Professor of Law, Howard University


Andy Gavil
Source: Reuters
December 10, 2020

What Happened to the Deepfake Threat to the Election?

“Deepfake videos and audios could undermine the democratic process by tipping an election.” — Danielle Citron, Professor of Law, Boston University

 


Danielle Citron
Source: Wired
November 16, 2020

Tech Tent: Is Facebook Fixable?

"Facebook was basically caught flat-footed, even though anybody who studies American politics would have known that one of our two political parties would do everything it could to delegitimise the process." — Siva Vaidhyanathan, Professor of Modern Media Studies, University of Virginia


Siva Vaidhyanathan
Source: BBC.com
November 13, 2020
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Fact Sheets

Cloud Computing

“Cloud computing” describes how computer-related services and software increasingly have been provided over the Internet and other networks since the late 1990s.

Featured Article

Hero or Villain: The Data Controller in Privacy Law and Technologies

By embracing privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), privacy law can better protect individuals from surveillance and other intrusions. Trusting data controllers leaves privacy vulnerable to a single point of failure.

By: Omer Tene, Claudia Diaz, Seda Gürses