Issues

Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

Back to main Privacy and Security page

TAP Blog

There has been a surge in phishing attacks and online scams taking advantage of COVID-19-related uncertainties and vulnerabilities. Carnegie Mellon University Professor Lorrie Cranor shares insights from her anti-phishing research.
Privacy expert Omer Tene provides a review of the two-year-old GDPR: he highlights strengths of the EU’s sweeping data protection regulation, and also discusses aspects of the law that need more work.
In an op-ed article for the Los Angeles Times, Woodrow Hartzog, Professor of Law and Computer Science at Northeastern University, shares his insights into Google and Apple’s contact tracing project, and he discusses the “three concerns to keep in mind about relying on technology to mitigate the COVID-19 crisis.”
Privacy expert Paul Schwartz, UC Berkeley, examines two proposed federal bills developed for the regulation of a COVID-19-tracking app in order to protect the privacy of health information.
UC Berkeley Professor Paul Schwartz examines the debates around the globe about the use and development of COVID-19 tracking apps. Given the great concern about the impact of these apps on privacy and civil liberties, he provides a compilation of best practices from European and U.S. data privacy protection organizations.
University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo and his colleagues Ashkan Soltani (independent privacy researcher and technologist), and Carl Bergstrom (University of Washington biology professor) delved into the feasibility of whether contact-tracing apps can be effective and safeguard individuals’ privacy.
TAP scholars danah boyd, Eric Goldman, Evan Selinger, and Joseph Turow share their expertise with a recent Pew Research Center report aimed at learning the potential future effects of people’s use of technology on democracy.
George Washington University privacy law expert Daniel Solove deconstructs the privacy paradox in his new article, “The Myth of the Privacy Paradox.”
Five TAP Scholars have been honored with the Future of Privacy Forum’s Privacy Papers for Policymakers Award. Read summaries of the papers selected for this 10th annual award that recognizes leading privacy scholarship relevant to U.S. policymakers.
Professor Evan Selinger, Rochester Institute of Technology, and his colleague devised a semester-long program intended to challenge the biases and presumptions developers bring to their professional projects.
Results 1 - 10 of 400
|< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >|

Fact Sheets

Privacy and Consumers

There are a number of privacy issues related to how online companies collect, store, use and share personally identifiable information; and how consumers are informed about what is done with their information online.

Quote

The Privacy Issues of Letting Big Tech Tackle the Pandemic

"Those who champion the use of smartphone tracking often ignore that the countries that successfully curbed their pandemics used smartphone apps alongside rigorous testing and aggressive physical-distancing measures." — Ryan Calo, Co-director, University of Washington Tech Policy Lab
M. Ryan Calo
The Globe and Mail
April 23, 2020

Featured Article

Brief of Scholars of the History and Original Meaning of the Fourth Amendment as Amici Curiae in Support of Petitioner in Carpenter v. United States

Police use data from cell phone providers to track the movements of suspects over a long period of time. Unlimited access to such data threatens privacy rights protected by the Fourth Amendment.

By: Danielle Citron, George C. Thomas, David C. Gray, Laura Donohue, Luke Milligan, Margaret Hu, Morgan Cloud, Norman Garland, Renee M. Hutchins, Tracey Maclin, William J. Cuddihy