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Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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TAP Blog

Professor Danielle Citron is the inaugural director of the LawTech Center, a new scholarly center at the University of Virginia Law School.
Next week, privacy law experts Professor Daniel Solove, George Washington University, and Professor Paul Schwartz, University of California, Berkeley, gather privacy and security professionals together for a 3-day virtual forum.
Introduction to several recent articles by TAP scholars that explore the impact of artificial intelligence technologies on the future of work, racial and gender equity, privacy, and administrative accountability.
George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove shares his conversation with Oscar Gandy about his reflections on the past 30 years of data gathering. This interview coincides with the publication of the 2nd edition of Professor Gandy’s book, The Panoptic Sort.
In their new paper, “Breaking the Privacy Gridlock: A Broader Look at Remedies,” privacy experts Chris Hoofnagle, James Dempsey, Ira Rubinstein, and Katherine Strandburg examine regulatory structures outside the field of information privacy in order to identify enforcement and remedy structures that may be useful in developing federal consumer privacy legislation.
Professor Joseph Turow, Annenberg School for Communication, discusses the technology changes in voice profiling, and explains how “companies could soon tailor what they try to sell you based on the mood conveyed by the sound of your voice.”
In this second of a two-part article exploring the intense negotiations between the US and EU over adequate surveillance in the name of national security, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes, examines the EU position on the relevance of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and shares possible counter-arguments for the US perspective.
In this first of a two-part articles exploring the intense negotiations between the US and EU over what should be included and excluded when it comes to surveillance in the name of national security, and as a successor to the now invalid Privacy Shield, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes, delves into the US arguments for direct access to data by its intelligence agencies.
In their new article, “Privacy Harms,” privacy experts and law professors Danielle Citron, University of Virginia, and Daniel Solove, George Washington University, discuss the legal challenges in holding privacy violators accountable for the harms they cause.
Professor Nicholas Economides, Stern School of Business of NYU, and Professor Ioannis Lianos, University College of London Faculty of Laws, explain how digital platforms have caused a market failure.
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Fact Sheets

Privacy and Consumers

There are a number of privacy issues related to how online companies collect, store, use and share personally identifiable information; and how consumers are informed about what is done with their information online.

Quote

Talking about abortion online in Texas? What you say on Facebook or Twitter could hurt you

“This is such a terrifying assault on intimate privacy. It incentivizes spying and exposure of women and girls and their intimate relationships and reproductive life that is unfathomably troubling.” — Danielle Citron, Professor of Law, University of Virginia

Danielle Citron
USA Today
September 4, 2021

Featured Article

The Impact of Online Surveillance on Behavior

Online surveillance has a chilling effect on online behavior, affecting Google searches, Wikipedia use, and expression of controversial opinions. Researchers can study consumer behavior before and after the shock of revelations about surveillance in 2013.

By: Catherine Tucker, Alex Marthews