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Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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Next week, privacy law experts Professor Daniel Solove, George Washington University, and Professor Paul Schwartz, University of California, Berkeley, gather privacy and security professionals together for a 3-day virtual forum.
A new report by Georgia Tech Professor Peter Swire provides a framework for assessing issues of data portability.
George Washington University privacy law professor Daniel Solove provides some information about the LGPD, Brazil’s new privacy law.
In their recent paper, “A Duty of Loyalty for Privacy Law,” Professors Neil Richards and Woodrow Hartzog propose imposing a duty of loyalty on companies that collect and process human information.
Carnegie Mellon University computer science and privacy expert Lorrie Cranor and her colleague Hana Habib, Graduate Research Assistant with CMU, explain what the private-browsing tools available with most browsers actually provide users. They clarify: “don’t confuse privacy for anonymity.”
A selection of articles recently written by TAP scholars explore AI and business competition, autonomous vehicles, how privacy regulation could support innovation, privacy interfaces focused on peoples’ needs, and licensing standard-essential patents for 5G telecommunications.
George Washington University privacy law expert Daniel Solove shares his insights from reviewing the ‘Schrems II’ ruling, and he discusses possible options –post Schrems II-- to transfer personal data from the EU to the U.S.
Georgia Tech law and ethics professor Peter Swire reviews the Schrems II ruling and discusses some of the challenges with reconciling fundamental rights and national security.
This is the second of a two-part post from TAP guest blogger, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes. Professor Christakis discusses the constitutional implications created by the Schrems II judgment not only for the EU but also for greater Europe.
This is the first of a two-part post from TAP guest blogger, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes. Professor Christakis discusses the uncertainties created by the Schrems II judgment for the future of international data transfers.
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Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Quote

A Super-surveillance Society and Its Impact on Democracy

No country with too strong or too weak state power can generate economic growth. — Daron Acemoglu, Professor of Economics, MIT
Daron Acemoglu
The Japan Times
September 6, 2020

Featured Article

The Costs of Not Using Data: Balancing Privacy and the Perils of Inaction

Some legal norms direct organizations to limit use of data, but others compel use of data to benefit the public. Data collectors may serve as information fiduciaries, obligated to act in users’ interests.

By: Omer Tene, Gabe Maldoff