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Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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TAP Blog

Law professor Eric Goldman, Santa Clara University, explains why the California Age Appropriate Design Code Act, AB 2273, “would radically reshape the Internet” if signed into law.
Santa Clara internet law scholar Eric Goldman writes about California AB2408, proposed legislation intended to address social media platforms that are addictive to children.
Privacy law expert Daniel Solove, George Washington University, discusses the positive and concerning elements of the proposed American Data Privacy and Protection Act being discussed in Congress.
Privacy law scholars Woodrow Hartzog, Boston University, and Neil Richards, Washington University in St. Louis, have been exploring the concept of data loyalty for a number of years. In an article they wrote for IAPP Perspectives, they examine several recently proposed bills to update privacy law in the United States.
In a recent article written for Slate, privacy law professor Danielle Citron says, “Intimate privacy is even more in jeopardy now that women’s reproductive choices may render them in violation of state criminal law.”
Professors Daniel Solove and Woodrow Hartzog present some key quotes from their new book, BREACHED! Why Data Security Law Fails and How to Improve It (Oxford University Press, 2022).
Professor Omer Tene, IAPP Senior Fellow, examines the hiQ Labs vs. LinkedIn Corporation decision to highlight the deep divide around the notion of privacy and data protection between Europe and the U.S. This decision also shows the sharp lines between privacy and competition policy, particularly in the context of major tech platforms and the data ecosystems they nurture.
George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove interviews Washington University law professor Neil Richards about his book, "Why Privacy Matters".
Introduction to recent books by TAP scholars that examine issues about privacy, AI, patents, antitrust, national security, and cloud computing.
Guest blogger Jake Chanenson provides a report on the 3rd Symposium on Contextual Integrity, of which TAP scholar Helen Nissenbaum was among the organizers.
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Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Quote

Abortion Bans Are Going to Make Stalkerware Even More Dangerous

“Policymakers tend to view privacy violations in silos, so they pursue reforms in a piecemeal manner. One day, proposals focus on nonconsensual pornography; the next, deepfake sex videos, still another, the confidentiality of people’s COVID statuses; and so on. To the extent that the law is updated, the reforms are often overly narrow. ” — Danielle Citron, Professor of Law, University of Virginia

Danielle Citron
Slate – Future Tense
July 5, 2022

Featured Article

Born in the USA: The GDPR and the Case for Transatlantic Privacy Convergence

Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) imposes privacy rules that differ significantly from privacy policies in the United States. But the GDPR often draws on US sources, revealing that Europe and the US share privacy values.

By: Omer Tene, Gabe Maldoff