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Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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TAP Blog

Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein provides a tongue-in-cheek look at notable information technology events and people from 2019.
Professor Daniel Solove discusses strategies for sustaining compliance with the GDPR, CCPA, and forthcoming regulations.
Professor Ed Felten and his research colleagues at Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy identify issues with data breach notifications that make it possible for “scammers to create fake phishing emails, potentially victimizing users twice.”
Professor Eric Goldman, Santa Clara University, provides a look into the four amicus briefs filed in support of a panel review of the Ninth Circuit’s ruling in Enigma v. Malwarebytes. This is a Section 230(c)(2) opinion that creates significant problems for anti-spyware/spam/virus vendors.
In “Algorithmic Impact Assessments under the GDPR: Producing Multi-layered Explanations”, Colorado Law Professor Margot Kaminski and Gianclaudio Malgieri, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, explore how a Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) links the two faces of the GDPR’s approach to algorithmic accountability: individual rights and systemic collaborative governance.
Contextual integrity (CI) was first proposed by Helen Nissenbaum in 2004 as a new framework for reasoning about privacy. Discussing how CI can inform policy and system design, and how the theory can be refined, operationalized, and applied to emerging technologies was the focus of the 2nd Symposium on Applications of Contextual Integrity.


Numerous colleagues have paid tribute to Professor Ian Kerr over the past month. TAP presents a few of the tributes that express how deeply his friendship, mentoring, scholarship, and zest for life are missed.

Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein shares findings from studying the aftermath of the Dyn DDOS attack in 2016.
Boston University law professor Danielle Citron shares how the use of deepfake technology to manipulate video and audio for malicious purposes is becoming a real threat.
Chris Hoofnagle (University of California, Berkeley), Woodrow Hartzog (Northeastern University), and Daniel Solove (George Washington University) have joined forces to bring their expertise and insights to the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) privacy regulatory efforts.
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Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Quote

Here Are All the Battlefronts TikTok Is Currently Fighting On

“If a bunch of congressmen go to their teenagers and say they've banned their favorite app, there might be a lot of pushback and that could matter.” — Mark Lemley, Professor of Law, Stanford University
Mark Lemley
CNN Business
July 20, 2020

Featured Article

Privacy’s Constitutional Moment and the Limits of Data Protection

The United States Congress must decide whether to enact a national privacy law like Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). But GDPR-style rules fail to protect against many harms of data overuse.

By: Neil Richards, Woodrow Hartzog