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Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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TAP Blog

The Supreme Court has long held that there is no expectation of privacy in public for the purposes of the Fourth Amendment. In United States v. Jones, which involves a warrantless GPS surveillance, the Court will confront just how far this logic can extend. Professor Daniel Solove looks at this case and asks, will the Court revisit its view about the lack of privacy in public given the changing capabilities of technology?
danah boyd discusses a new article she and her colleagues recently published on children’s use of social media, and the effect of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act on the kids and their parents.
The discussion on Internet Freedom continued last week with the second installment of the George Washington Law speaker series. The event featured Dr. Ian Brown, a senior research fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute. Post provides a summary of Dr. Brown’s key points from his presentation, and a link to view video of entire presentation.
Well into the thick of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, cybersecurity proposals are beginning to meld. One of the key areas to combat cybercrime that is being echoed across U.S. agencies is to share knowledge. The Securities and Exchange Commission just released guidelines that require publicly traded companies to report instances of cyber attack. TAP academic Andrea Matwyshyn wrote an article that advocates just this point.
Last Friday’s 2011 Cybercrime Conference, jointly hosted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Western District of Washington, and the University of Washington School of Law, examined the current trends in cybercrime, security in the cloud, and the trade-offs between sharing and securing private information. Keynote speaker, Edward Felten, Chief Technologist with the Federal Trade Commission, discussed why cybercrime losses continue to rise and what government can do to help address the issues.
Last Friday’s 2011 Cybercrime Conference, jointly hosted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Western District of Washington, and the University of Washington School of Law, examined the current trends in cybercrime, security in the cloud; and keynote speaker, Edward Felten, Chief Technologist with the Federal Trade Commission, discussed what government can do to help address the issues. In this post, TAP reports on the trade-offs between sharing and securing private information.
Friday’s 2011 Cybercrime Conference, jointly hosted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Western District of Washington, and the University of Washington School of Law, examined the current trends in cybercrime, security in the cloud, and the trade-offs between sharing and securing private information. Keynote speaker, Edward Felten, Chief Technologist with the Federal Trade Commission, discussed why cybercrime losses continue to rise and what government can do to help address the issues.
Professor Daniel Solove, George Washington University Law School, talks with Professor Lior Strahilevitz, University of Chicago Law School, about his new book, "Information and Exclusion." In the course of their conversation, they examine the topic of exclusion –how information and mechanisms are used to exclude people. Additionally, they discuss the role of privacy in this age of “digital dossiers.”
Given the release last week of the Federal Trade Commission’s proposed changes to COPPA (the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act), TAP highlights the work of its scholars with expertise in location-based tracking, facial recognition, and the use of cookies to collect personal data.
Professor Andrea Matwyshyn of University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School talks about the value in nurturing hacking interests in America’s youth.
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Fact Sheets

Privacy and Consumers

There are a number of privacy issues related to how online companies collect, store, use and share personally identifiable information; and how consumers are informed about what is done with their information online.

Quote

A Super-surveillance Society and Its Impact on Democracy

No country with too strong or too weak state power can generate economic growth. — Daron Acemoglu, Professor of Economics, MIT
Daron Acemoglu
The Japan Times
September 6, 2020

Featured Article

“It’s a scavenger hunt”: Usability of Websites’ Opt-Out and Data Deletion Choices

Privacy laws require websites to offer consumers options such as the choice to opt out of advertising or to delete account data. On many sites, these options are poorly labelled and hard to find.

By: Alessandro Acquisti, Florian Schaub, Lorrie Faith Cranor, Hana Habib, Jiamin Wang, Norman Sadeh, Sarah Pearman, Yixin Zou