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Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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TAP Blog

In an op-ed article for the Los Angeles Times, Woodrow Hartzog, Professor of Law and Computer Science at Northeastern University, shares his insights into Google and Apple’s contact tracing project, and he discusses the “three concerns to keep in mind about relying on technology to mitigate the COVID-19 crisis.”
Privacy expert Paul Schwartz, UC Berkeley, examines two proposed federal bills developed for the regulation of a COVID-19-tracking app in order to protect the privacy of health information.
UC Berkeley Professor Paul Schwartz examines the debates around the globe about the use and development of COVID-19 tracking apps. Given the great concern about the impact of these apps on privacy and civil liberties, he provides a compilation of best practices from European and U.S. data privacy protection organizations.
University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo and his colleagues Ashkan Soltani (independent privacy researcher and technologist), and Carl Bergstrom (University of Washington biology professor) delved into the feasibility of whether contact-tracing apps can be effective and safeguard individuals’ privacy.
TAP scholars danah boyd, Eric Goldman, Evan Selinger, and Joseph Turow share their expertise with a recent Pew Research Center report aimed at learning the potential future effects of people’s use of technology on democracy.
George Washington University privacy law expert Daniel Solove deconstructs the privacy paradox in his new article, “The Myth of the Privacy Paradox.”
Five TAP Scholars have been honored with the Future of Privacy Forum’s Privacy Papers for Policymakers Award. Read summaries of the papers selected for this 10th annual award that recognizes leading privacy scholarship relevant to U.S. policymakers.
Professor Evan Selinger, Rochester Institute of Technology, and his colleague devised a semester-long program intended to challenge the biases and presumptions developers bring to their professional projects.
Section 230 and user-generated content are among the issues highlighted in law professor Eric Goldman’s recap of 2019’s Internet law issues.
Professor Nicholas Economides, Stern School of Business at NYU, and his co-author Ioannis Lianos, University College London and Hellenic Competition Commission, examine the collection of personal information from online platforms, such as Google and Facebook, from an antitrust perspective.
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Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Quote

He Created the Web. Now He’s Out to Remake the Digital World.

“In this changed regulatory setting, there is a market opportunity for Tim Berners-Lee's firm and others to offer individuals better ways to control their data.” — Peter Swire, Law and Ethics Professor , Georgia Tech

Peter Swire
The New York Times
January 10, 2021

Featured Article

Privacy and Security Across Borders

New rules in the United States, Europe, and Australia give law enforcement access to digital evidence even when the data is stored abroad. These rules may conflict.

By: Jennifer Daskal