Issues

Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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TAP Blog

Young-adult Americans have an aspiration for increased privacy even while they participate in an online reality that is optimized to increase their revelation of personal data.
Reducing identity theft is a matter of shifting creditor grantors' incentives.
Privacy is one of the issues that TAP scholars have explored in great depth. This post provides a sample of articles available on privacy and consumer protection.
An overview of the first panel of the Silicon Flatirons conference which examined the Internet's ecosystem.
Incentive conflicts prevent some companies from providing effective notices to consumers. Here is an example of an effective consumer notice.
A collection of articles exploring online privacy issues from the user and provider perspectives.
How information technology changes privacy in many ways. By Joseph Lorenzo Hall,Postdoctoral Research Associate at Berkeley School of Information.
The Federal Trade Commission hosted a series of public roundtable discussions to explore the privacy challenges posted by the vast array of 21st century technology and business practices that collect and use consumer data.
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Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Quote

What Your Android Phone’s New “Data Safety” Labels Mean

“Most of us want privacy, but we don’t want to spend every waking moment thinking about privacy.” — Lorrie Cranor, Director of the CyLab Security & Privacy Institute, Carnegie Mellon University,

Lorrie Faith Cranor
The Washington Post
May 5, 2022

Featured Article

The Right to Quantitative Privacy

Law enforcement agencies subject citizens to surveillance by systems that aggregate large amounts of data from sources such as telephone records or drones. Such indiscriminate, broad surveillance violates Fourth Amendment privacy rights.

By: Danielle Citron, David C. Gray