Issues

Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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TAP Blog

Take a look at the top viewed blog posts from this past year that have been written by TAP scholars.
George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove provides his list of notable books on privacy and security from 2019.
Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein provides a tongue-in-cheek look at notable information technology events and people from 2019.
Professor Daniel Solove discusses strategies for sustaining compliance with the GDPR, CCPA, and forthcoming regulations.
Professor Ed Felten and his research colleagues at Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy identify issues with data breach notifications that make it possible for “scammers to create fake phishing emails, potentially victimizing users twice.”
Professor Eric Goldman, Santa Clara University, provides a look into the four amicus briefs filed in support of a panel review of the Ninth Circuit’s ruling in Enigma v. Malwarebytes. This is a Section 230(c)(2) opinion that creates significant problems for anti-spyware/spam/virus vendors.
In “Algorithmic Impact Assessments under the GDPR: Producing Multi-layered Explanations”, Colorado Law Professor Margot Kaminski and Gianclaudio Malgieri, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, explore how a Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) links the two faces of the GDPR’s approach to algorithmic accountability: individual rights and systemic collaborative governance.
Contextual integrity (CI) was first proposed by Helen Nissenbaum in 2004 as a new framework for reasoning about privacy. Discussing how CI can inform policy and system design, and how the theory can be refined, operationalized, and applied to emerging technologies was the focus of the 2nd Symposium on Applications of Contextual Integrity.


Numerous colleagues have paid tribute to Professor Ian Kerr over the past month. TAP presents a few of the tributes that express how deeply his friendship, mentoring, scholarship, and zest for life are missed.

Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein shares findings from studying the aftermath of the Dyn DDOS attack in 2016.
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Fact Sheets

Privacy and Consumers

There are a number of privacy issues related to how online companies collect, store, use and share personally identifiable information; and how consumers are informed about what is done with their information online.

Quote

He Created the Web. Now He’s Out to Remake the Digital World.

“In this changed regulatory setting, there is a market opportunity for Tim Berners-Lee's firm and others to offer individuals better ways to control their data.” — Peter Swire, Law and Ethics Professor , Georgia Tech

Peter Swire
The New York Times
January 10, 2021

Featured Article

The Costs of Not Using Data: Balancing Privacy and the Perils of Inaction

Some legal norms direct organizations to limit use of data, but others compel use of data to benefit the public. Data collectors may serve as information fiduciaries, obligated to act in users’ interests.

By: Omer Tene, Gabe Maldoff