Issues

Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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Quotes

Should Alexa Read Our Moods?

“Using the human body for discriminating among people is something that we should not do.” — Joseph Turow, Professor of Media Systems & Industries, University of Pennsylvania


Joseph Turow
Source: The New York Times
May 19, 2021

Shhhh, They’re Listening – Inside the Coming Voice-Profiling Revolution

“Consider, too, the discrimination that can take place if voice profilers follow some scientists’ claims that it is possible to use an individual’s vocalizations to tell the person’s height, weight, race, gender, and health.” — Joseph Turow, Professor of Media Systems, Annenberg School for Communication


Joseph Turow
Source: Fast Company
May 3, 2021

The EU Is Considering a Ban on AI for Mass Surveillance and Social Credit Scores

“If the proposals are passed, said Tene, it will create a “vast regulatory ecosystem.” — Omer Tene, Vice President, Chief Knowledge Officer, IAPP


Omer Tene
Source: The Verge
April 14, 2021

He Created the Web. Now He’s Out to Remake the Digital World.

“In this changed regulatory setting, there is a market opportunity for Tim Berners-Lee's firm and others to offer individuals better ways to control their data.” — Peter Swire, Law and Ethics Professor , Georgia Tech


Peter Swire
Source: The New York Times
January 10, 2021

How to Use Apple's Privacy Labels for Apps

"In order for competition to happen on privacy, people have to be aware of what’s actually going on, or there’s no hope for apps differentiating themselves." — Lorrie Cranor, Professor of Security and Privacy Technologies, Carnegie Mellon University


Lorrie Faith Cranor
Source: Consumer Reports
December 18, 2020

AI Decoded: France’s Risky Dance with Surveillance

“There is no facial recognition component in the current bill. A devil’s advocate could say once it is adopted, things could change.” — Théodore Christakis, Professor of Law, Université Grenoble Alpes
Theodore Christakis
Source: Politico
December 2, 2020

Remote Workers More at Risk for Social Engineered Deception and Cyberattack

“42 percent of the U.S. labor force [is] now working from home full-time. In fact, almost twice as many employees are working from home as at work.” — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University


Nicholas Bloom
Source: Security
November 16, 2020

Digital Hygiene in the Zoom Era

"When your camera is on, make sure your computer is facing the wall. Other than your cat dropping in, it should be hard for anyone to get into the frame.” — Lorrie Cranor, Director and Bosch Distinguished Professor in Security and Privacy Technologies, Carnegie Mellon University


Lorrie Faith Cranor
Source: The New York Times
October 22, 2020

A Super-surveillance Society and Its Impact on Democracy

No country with too strong or too weak state power can generate economic growth. — Daron Acemoglu, Professor of Economics, MIT
Daron Acemoglu
Source: The Japan Times
September 6, 2020

Wall St Has Never Seen a Company Like Palantir

“We need to come to a place where data controllers are required to have procedures and safeguards, and effective enforcement against abuse.” — Chris Hoofnagle, Professor of Law, University of California at Berkeley
Chris Hoofnagle
Source: FR24 News
September 4, 2020
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TAP Blog

Taking a Broader Look at Privacy Remedies

In their new paper, “Breaking the Privacy Gridlock: A Broader Look at Remedies,” privacy experts Chris Hoofnagle, James Dempsey, Ira Rubinstein, and Katherine Strandburg examine regulatory structures outside the field of information privacy in order to identify enforcement and remedy structures that may be useful in developing federal consumer privacy legislation.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Privacy and Consumers

There are a number of privacy issues related to how online companies collect, store, use and share personally identifiable information; and how consumers are informed about what is done with their information online.

Featured Article

National Security, Surveillance and Human Rights

The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) often decides cases involving a conflict between human rights and surveillance systems intended to protect national security. Surveillance must be necessary and lawful.

By: Théodore Christakis, Katia Bouslimani