Issues

Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

Back to main Privacy and Security page

Quotes

Talking about abortion online in Texas? What you say on Facebook or Twitter could hurt you

“This is such a terrifying assault on intimate privacy. It incentivizes spying and exposure of women and girls and their intimate relationships and reproductive life that is unfathomably troubling.” — Danielle Citron, Professor of Law, University of Virginia


Danielle Citron
Source: USA Today
September 4, 2021

Talking about abortion online in Texas? What you say on Facebook or Twitter could hurt you

“The net result of the new Texas law will be to chill all speech, online and off.” — Eric Goldman, Director of the High Tech Law Institute, Santa Clara University


Eric Goldman
Source: USA Today
September 4, 2021

Should Alexa Read Our Moods?

“Using the human body for discriminating among people is something that we should not do.” — Joseph Turow, Professor of Media Systems & Industries, University of Pennsylvania


Joseph Turow
Source: The New York Times
May 19, 2021

Shhhh, They’re Listening – Inside the Coming Voice-Profiling Revolution

“Consider, too, the discrimination that can take place if voice profilers follow some scientists’ claims that it is possible to use an individual’s vocalizations to tell the person’s height, weight, race, gender, and health.” — Joseph Turow, Professor of Media Systems, Annenberg School for Communication


Joseph Turow
Source: Fast Company
May 3, 2021

The EU Is Considering a Ban on AI for Mass Surveillance and Social Credit Scores

“If the proposals are passed, said Tene, it will create a “vast regulatory ecosystem.” — Omer Tene, Vice President, Chief Knowledge Officer, IAPP


Omer Tene
Source: The Verge
April 14, 2021

He Created the Web. Now He’s Out to Remake the Digital World.

“In this changed regulatory setting, there is a market opportunity for Tim Berners-Lee's firm and others to offer individuals better ways to control their data.” — Peter Swire, Law and Ethics Professor , Georgia Tech


Peter Swire
Source: The New York Times
January 10, 2021

How to Use Apple's Privacy Labels for Apps

"In order for competition to happen on privacy, people have to be aware of what’s actually going on, or there’s no hope for apps differentiating themselves." — Lorrie Cranor, Professor of Security and Privacy Technologies, Carnegie Mellon University


Lorrie Faith Cranor
Source: Consumer Reports
December 18, 2020

AI Decoded: France’s Risky Dance with Surveillance

“There is no facial recognition component in the current bill. A devil’s advocate could say once it is adopted, things could change.” — Théodore Christakis, Professor of Law, Université Grenoble Alpes
Theodore Christakis
Source: Politico
December 2, 2020

Remote Workers More at Risk for Social Engineered Deception and Cyberattack

“42 percent of the U.S. labor force [is] now working from home full-time. In fact, almost twice as many employees are working from home as at work.” — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University


Nicholas Bloom
Source: Security
November 16, 2020

Digital Hygiene in the Zoom Era

"When your camera is on, make sure your computer is facing the wall. Other than your cat dropping in, it should be hard for anyone to get into the frame.” — Lorrie Cranor, Director and Bosch Distinguished Professor in Security and Privacy Technologies, Carnegie Mellon University


Lorrie Faith Cranor
Source: The New York Times
October 22, 2020
Results 1 - 10 of 325
|< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >|

TAP Blog

Danielle Citron Leads New LawTech Center at UVA

Professor Danielle Citron is the inaugural director of the LawTech Center, a new scholarly center at the University of Virginia Law School.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Featured Article

The Costs of Not Using Data: Balancing Privacy and the Perils of Inaction

Some legal norms direct organizations to limit use of data, but others compel use of data to benefit the public. Data collectors may serve as information fiduciaries, obligated to act in users’ interests.

By: Omer Tene, Gabe Maldoff