Issues

Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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Quotes

When Social Media Mining Gets It Wrong


Alessandro Acquisti
Source: MIT Technology Review
August 9, 2011

Face-ID Tools Pose New Risk


Alessandro Acquisti
Source: Wall Street Journal
August 1, 2011

Protect Your Privacy Online


Alessandro Acquisti
Source: Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine
June 1, 2011

Lawmakers Look at Phone Tracking


Joseph Turow
Source: Washington Post
May 8, 2011

Child porn case shows danger of Net routers


John Palfrey
Source: Boston Herald
April 26, 2011

Freedom and Anonymity: Keeping the Internet Open


Jonathan Zittrain
Source: Scientific American
February 24, 2011

'Do Not Track' Internet Privacy Bill Introduced in House


M. Ryan Calo
Source: Los Angeles Times
February 11, 2011
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TAP Blog

Taking a Broader Look at Privacy Remedies

In their new paper, “Breaking the Privacy Gridlock: A Broader Look at Remedies,” privacy experts Chris Hoofnagle, James Dempsey, Ira Rubinstein, and Katherine Strandburg examine regulatory structures outside the field of information privacy in order to identify enforcement and remedy structures that may be useful in developing federal consumer privacy legislation.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Featured Article

People Analytics and Invisible Labor

“Invisible labor” includes many aspects of unrecognized work. Data analytics intended to help employers assess the quality of a worker’s efforts might not measure invisible labor effectively.

By: Miriam A. Cherry