Issues

Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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Upcoming Events

[Online] 2020 Privacy Law Scholars Conference

Co-sponsored by BCLT and GW Law

June 4, 2020,  

PrivacyCon 2020

Presented by the Federal Trade Commission

July 21, 2020, Washington, DC

Symposium on Applications of Contextual Integrity

Presented by DLI @ Cornell

September 21, 2020, Chicago, IL

TPRC48: Research Conference on Communications, Information and Internet Policy

Hosted by the American University Washington College of Law

September 25, 2020, Washington, DC

9th Annual BCLT Privacy Law Forum: Silicon Valley

Presented by Berkeley Center for Law & Technology

October 9, 2020, East Palo Alto, CA

TAP Blog

Professor Lorrie Cranor Provides Tips on How to Protect Against Phishing Attacks

There has been a surge in phishing attacks and online scams taking advantage of COVID-19-related uncertainties and vulnerabilities. Carnegie Mellon University Professor Lorrie Cranor shares insights from her anti-phishing research.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Quote

The Privacy Issues of Letting Big Tech Tackle the Pandemic

"Those who champion the use of smartphone tracking often ignore that the countries that successfully curbed their pandemics used smartphone apps alongside rigorous testing and aggressive physical-distancing measures." — Ryan Calo, Co-director, University of Washington Tech Policy Lab
M. Ryan Calo
The Globe and Mail
April 23, 2020

Featured Article

Soft Law: New Tools for Governing Emerging Technologies

Traditionally, nations harmonized their own regulation of new technologies with the rules of other nations through negotiation of international treaties. "Soft law" tools such as private standards and codes of conduct are less resource-intensive than treaties.

By: Braden Allenby, Gary Marchant